Tag Archives: interns

What type are you: Outfitter? Orality Overcomer? Obi-Wan Kenobi?

 

Do you like personality tests?  Some people repeatedly retake the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® assessment to see if they have changed their personality.

My kids, meanwhile, love online personality quizzes like “Which Star Wars Character Are You?”

Recently they found this “infographic” which combined the two concepts.  Here’s an excerpt:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My kids, checking up on their parents’ MBTI® types, dissolved in hysterics to learn that they were the product of a union between C-3PO’s personality and Yoda’s.

Such quizzes not only make for entertainment but also for interesting insights and discussions—with application for global mission.  I can envision a church-planting team having an extended discussion on whether they have the right mix of Star Wars/MBTI personalities to overcome the strongholds of evil in their quadrant—and using the results to inform recruitment of new team members.

However, another type of segmentation might prove more relevant—such as a quiz that lets you know your church-planting personality (more on that later).

With good data and the right analyst, your ministry can develop segments (donors, workers, prospects, churches, peoples) based on specific, relevant information that is most meaningful for your ministry.  Further, you can create classifying tools (quizzes) that your people can take to better understand themselves—or their ministry environment—informing Spirit-led decision making.

Most people are familiar with simple segmentation approaches that rely on one measure (such as birth year) that does a reasonably good job of dividing a large group into meaningful subgroups (such as Gen Xers and Millenials) that reflect a set of shared traits.

The MBTI rubric uses four dimensions of personality, each with two poles.  Tests determine on which side of each spectrum a person falls.  Voila!  Sixteen possible personality combinations emerge.

Mission researchers like Patrick Johnstone and Todd Johnson have popularized geo-cultural “affinity blocs”—segments that reflect collections of people groups on the basis of shared social/religious/geographic/cultural traits.  It is much easier to remember and depict 15 affinity blocs than 12,000 people groups.

Recently, GMI has done value-based or activity-based segmentation analysis on several survey projects.  One is the subject of GMI’s featured missiographic for early November—giving an overview of five personalities of those investigating mission agency websites, based on their information needs.

One of those segments is Faith Matchers—those for whom theological alignment is of primary importance.  When Faith Matchers visit an agency website, they are looking first for to see if an agency’s beliefs align with theirs before considering strategy, location or service opportunities.

Last week we learned that one agency web designer had read the detailed website visitor profiles and related communications ideas in GMI’s Agency Web Review report and made a small adjustment to the website to make sure that Faith Matchers would be able to find the agency’s statement of faith with a single click from the home page—an easy change based on segmentation analysis.

Some of our other recent segmentation work included identifying :

  • Three mission agency CEO personalities (Outfitters, Entrepreneurs and Mobilizers) based on organizational-, staff- and personal-effectiveness priorities, as described in the Missio Nexus 2013 CEO Survey Report based on the responses of more than 150 agency leaders.
  • Three motivation-based segments (Where, Whether and Whatever) for those considering six-to-24-month mission internships, drawn from a quick survey of GMI’s panel of future missionaries.  One group is committed to long-term service and discerning where or with what agency it should serve.  One segment is discerning whether it is called/cut-out for long-term mission service.  The largest segment is eager to serve now, with little or thought given to post-internship service (whatever).  Following is a scatterplot of the 205 respondents.

 

  • Four Church Planter personalities (Word-based Advocates, Orality Overcomers, Trade-Language Strategists and Judicious Intercessors) based on how often they engaged in “fruitful practice” activities, from a survey of nearly 400 church planters working among resistant peoples.

For that last one, we developed a 10-question quiz that church-planting workers can take to discover the strengths and potential growth areas of their church-planting personality.  Sound interesting?  Write us for details on how to get a copy of the Church Planting Personality Profiler—it’s available to member agencies of a particular network.

In a follow-up post, we’ll discuss analysis approaches for creating segments and how scatterplots and the classification quizzes are developed.

 

Back to College – a week @biolau for #bmc2012

I’ve been blessed to assist several student mission conferences with evaluations and planning research.  But until last week, I’d never actually attended one in person.  Not as a student.  Not as an adult.

So, my impressions of the Biola Missions Conference 2012 come unjaded – but also with no basis for comparison.  Take them as you will.

Here’s what stood out to me:

  1. The amazing level of creativity and production values of the young adults.  I have often heard people talk about the sophistication of today’s young people in regard to media.  They have highly developed filters, they are tough to impress, etc.  But that’s about their reaction to content produced by others.  Last week the content that students created themselves was on display.  And I was impressed.
    Dance, drama, visual art, poetry, film, music, oratory, cuisine, fashion – creativity seemed to be everywhere, all the time – and always expressing a passion for God and for mission.It’s one thing to attend a professionally produced plenary session with creative stage lighting, choreographed dance numbers, moving testimonies, etc.  But upon leaving the assembly hall, I walked past sidewalk artists in the process of creating scripture-based chalk drawings, then past elaborately decorated booths to advocate for and educate about peoples in unreached lands.  I caught the aroma of African food in the air as I walked to the end of campus.  There, the line stretched around the building for Global Awareness, a series of interactive role plays where participants might find themselves in the midst of a Somalian hostage crisis or a Chinese house church.

    Now, wowing a guy who barely falls on the fringe of Gen X may be a low bar.  So, check out these examples of their work and tell me what you think.

    Biola is close by Hollywood, and I met at least two students who hope to shine their light in the entertainment industry after college.  That may have had something to do with the emphasis on art and production.  But I’m still amazed that the whole thing was pulled together in the spare time of people taking a full load of classes.

  2. A student-run event has its glitches – but it also has great educational value.  I encountered half a dozen bumps that would never have happened at a professionally run event, but each of them represented a lesson in project management that won’t soon be forgotten.  And the event staff were accessible and eager to address issues when they arose.  They don’t deserve a complaining spirit from me.So, I’ll mention only one incident, and that just to share the smile it brought.  During the Welcome Tea for mission agency reps, a student leader said, “For those of you staying on campus, I hope you remembered to bring bedding.”  Note for next year’s conference: consider including that detail in the pre-event info packet.  As it turned out, my student host (and I think many others) provided sheets and pillows for their missionary guests, generously trading their beds for four nights on the floor.
  3. Staying in the dorms is a bit of an adventure for a 40-something guy, what with students’ odd hours, having to climb over a bookshelf to get into the loft, and sharing a bathroom with 30 people.  Still, I would do it again in a heartbeat – and not just to save money on a hotel room – because several of my best conversations with students took place there.  Definitely a shot-in-the-arm to interact with talented, God-fearing men with big dreams and passion for the Kingdom.

If any Biola students or others considering long-term cross-cultural service are reading this post, I’d be honored if you would be willing to give your opinions a few times a year on mission-related issues.  Sign up for our Mission Research Panel here.

It’s also a great time for college students who want to apply their skills, passion and creativity in mission research for a few months to apply for a GMI internship.  Send your resume to info@gmi.org.

Looking forward to attending and speaking at Biola again next year!

 

New research: Perceptions about mission internships

This post teases GMI’s upcoming survey report on perceptions of mission internships among current and future missionaries.

UK-based mission researcher and Redcliffe College principal Rob Hay told me (years ago) that his research among future missionaries in Europe showed that many intended to serve long term, but few were willing to make a career-length commitment to an individual agency.

So, GMI thought that mission internships (6 months to 3 years) would make a good survey topic for its North American panels of long-term cross-cultural field missionaries and people considering long-term cross-cultural field service.

This post deals with an open-ended question about perceptions.  More than 300 field missionaries and more than 300 people considering long-term cross-cultural service were asked:

When you think of cross-cultural field internships, what are a few of the first words that come to mind?

Here are word clouds reflecting the frequency of the top 100 response terms.

Prospective Cross-Cultural Missionaries:

Current Cross-Cultural Missionaries: 

What do you notice about these two word clouds?  Here are a few things I noticed:

  • For future missionaries, internships appear to be a learning experience that comes with a healthy dose of work.  For current field missionaries, internships appear to be a work experience that comes with a healthy dose of learning.
  • Future missionaries see internships as a spiritual experience. God was prospective interns’ fourth-most-frequently used term.  Also, Jesus, prayer and faith appear among frequently-used terms.  This group is eager to see God and to be a part of God’s work in the world.
  • By contrast, current field staff view internships as a ministry experience, something related to work and profession.  You can see Godin the word cloud, but on a much smaller scale, and almost no other spiritual terms.  Hopefully, this isn’t reflective of the spirituality of field missionaries!  Rather, it shows that they view internships through the lens of work activity.
  • Work dominates the current field missionary cloud.  They likely view internships not only as a lot of work for the intern, but also as a lot of work for resident missionaries.  Interns require a good deal of supervision and mentoring, which takes time.  There are immediate benefits in terms of enthusiastic service and future benefits in terms of long-term recruiting potential, but obtaining those rewards has a cost: work.
  • Both groups see experience as a key descriptor of mission internships.  But in what sense is the word used?  Is it about having a valuable experience (to be reflected upon) or is it about gaining experience (to be applied in the future)?  For current missionaries, the perspective is forward-looking, with future, preparation and potential appearing.  For prospects, there is a bit more balance.  While long-term and training are prominent, so is rewarding – suggesting intrinsic value, not just preparatory value.
  • Both groups see internships as an opportunity and are generally positive about them.  Good and great appear in moderate-to-large type in both clouds.  Current field workers also used the terms beneficial, excellent, positive and effective.
  • Both groups also are well aware that mission service of any length is challenging.
  • Time is a key element in internships.  In both clouds, the words time, term, long and short appear.
  • Financial considerations are an issue for prospective missionaries.  Support and fundraising aren’t the most prominent terms, but they are a real challenge/barrier for some prospects.  Those terms don’t show up on field missionaries’ radar as a key element of internships – they may assume that people considering long-term service will certainly be able to raise funding for a shorter-term opportunity (with those dollars easier to raise because they do not require a long-term commitment from donors).

What do you see in these clouds?  What are you concerned that you can’t see?

New research: Field staff estimate that 1 in 3 interns convert to long-term missions

In 2004 I attended The Mission Exchange/CrossGlobal Link (then EFMA/IFMA) Personnel Conference.  One of the breakout sessions dealt with AIM’s TIMO program, one of the longest-running mission internship programs.

There was a bombshell moment when the presenter cited statistics about how many of the interns were still on the field. (I can’t recall exactly, but the numbers were staggering — something along the lines of 90 percent still serving, two-thirds of those with AIM.)  Mobilization directors’ jaws were dropping across the room, and you could sense that any agency there that didn’t have an internship program would soon be considering one.

Given that prospective cross-cultural workers today are less likely than those in previous generations to commit to a lifetime of service with a particular agency or among a particular people, and internships seem to make sense — an on-field experience that allows future workers to understand what it takes to live and work “out there,” and a low-risk opportunity for agencies to train and assess the fitness of candidates.

But creating an internship program requires time and money – plus substantial cooperation from long-term field staff, who will have to oversee the interns. Is it worth the effort?

In November and December 2011, we put this question — actually, several questions — to the GMI Research Panels — large groups of current and future cross-cultural field missionaries ready to give their opinion on mission-related issues.  We asked about perceptions of field internships (defined as a cross-cultural field experience lasting from six months to three years); satisfaction with internship programs, the likelihood of prospective missionaries to do an internship, and estimated conversion of interns to long-term field staff.

We heard from more than 300 cross-cultural missionaries (from more than 18 agencies) and from more than 300 people who are considering long-term cross-cultural service.  The following charts show some of the topline statistics:

A third of prospective missionaries said they are somewhat or very likely to do a mission internship. As you might expect, interest increases with one’s commitment to entering long-term cross-cultural service. More than half of those who intend to serve long term said that they are somewhat or very likely to do an internship in preparation.

Three quarters of the field missionaries surveyed had experience with interns. Of those, 6 in 10 agreed or strongly agreed that they are satisfied with their agency’s internship program, while acknowledging in open-ended comments that internships involve a lot of work for field staff.

They also estimate that 45 percent of interns stay active in full-time field service after their internship, with a third continuing to serve with the agency for which they interned.

How does these perceptions compare with your experience?  Are field internships worth the effort?

In the next post, we’ll explore current and future missionaries’ open-ended comments about mission internships.

Keep your eye on the GMI store for the detailed report, which will include more information about the key elements that lead to satisfaction with internships, as well as descriptions of three types of interns based on their motivation for service.