Tag Archives: segmentation

What type are you: Outfitter? Orality Overcomer? Obi-Wan Kenobi?

 

Do you like personality tests?  Some people repeatedly retake the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® assessment to see if they have changed their personality.

My kids, meanwhile, love online personality quizzes like “Which Star Wars Character Are You?”

Recently they found this “infographic” which combined the two concepts.  Here’s an excerpt:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My kids, checking up on their parents’ MBTI® types, dissolved in hysterics to learn that they were the product of a union between C-3PO’s personality and Yoda’s.

Such quizzes not only make for entertainment but also for interesting insights and discussions—with application for global mission.  I can envision a church-planting team having an extended discussion on whether they have the right mix of Star Wars/MBTI personalities to overcome the strongholds of evil in their quadrant—and using the results to inform recruitment of new team members.

However, another type of segmentation might prove more relevant—such as a quiz that lets you know your church-planting personality (more on that later).

With good data and the right analyst, your ministry can develop segments (donors, workers, prospects, churches, peoples) based on specific, relevant information that is most meaningful for your ministry.  Further, you can create classifying tools (quizzes) that your people can take to better understand themselves—or their ministry environment—informing Spirit-led decision making.

Most people are familiar with simple segmentation approaches that rely on one measure (such as birth year) that does a reasonably good job of dividing a large group into meaningful subgroups (such as Gen Xers and Millenials) that reflect a set of shared traits.

The MBTI rubric uses four dimensions of personality, each with two poles.  Tests determine on which side of each spectrum a person falls.  Voila!  Sixteen possible personality combinations emerge.

Mission researchers like Patrick Johnstone and Todd Johnson have popularized geo-cultural “affinity blocs”—segments that reflect collections of people groups on the basis of shared social/religious/geographic/cultural traits.  It is much easier to remember and depict 15 affinity blocs than 12,000 people groups.

Recently, GMI has done value-based or activity-based segmentation analysis on several survey projects.  One is the subject of GMI’s featured missiographic for early November—giving an overview of five personalities of those investigating mission agency websites, based on their information needs.

One of those segments is Faith Matchers—those for whom theological alignment is of primary importance.  When Faith Matchers visit an agency website, they are looking first for to see if an agency’s beliefs align with theirs before considering strategy, location or service opportunities.

Last week we learned that one agency web designer had read the detailed website visitor profiles and related communications ideas in GMI’s Agency Web Review report and made a small adjustment to the website to make sure that Faith Matchers would be able to find the agency’s statement of faith with a single click from the home page—an easy change based on segmentation analysis.

Some of our other recent segmentation work included identifying :

  • Three mission agency CEO personalities (Outfitters, Entrepreneurs and Mobilizers) based on organizational-, staff- and personal-effectiveness priorities, as described in the Missio Nexus 2013 CEO Survey Report based on the responses of more than 150 agency leaders.
  • Three motivation-based segments (Where, Whether and Whatever) for those considering six-to-24-month mission internships, drawn from a quick survey of GMI’s panel of future missionaries.  One group is committed to long-term service and discerning where or with what agency it should serve.  One segment is discerning whether it is called/cut-out for long-term mission service.  The largest segment is eager to serve now, with little or thought given to post-internship service (whatever).  Following is a scatterplot of the 205 respondents.

 

  • Four Church Planter personalities (Word-based Advocates, Orality Overcomers, Trade-Language Strategists and Judicious Intercessors) based on how often they engaged in “fruitful practice” activities, from a survey of nearly 400 church planters working among resistant peoples.

For that last one, we developed a 10-question quiz that church-planting workers can take to discover the strengths and potential growth areas of their church-planting personality.  Sound interesting?  Write us for details on how to get a copy of the Church Planting Personality Profiler—it’s available to member agencies of a particular network.

In a follow-up post, we’ll discuss analysis approaches for creating segments and how scatterplots and the classification quizzes are developed.

 

Applied research helps donors, implementers to be better partners

Research provides a needed listening function for the mission community.  Listening well results in better understanding, and better understanding usually leads to better ministry.

A great example of the way that research increases understanding and leads to practical action in ministry is the Lausanne Standards project that fosters dialogue and collaboration among ministry implementers and funders about the giving and receiving of money in mission.

Check out this entertaining whiteboard video that illustrates (literally) how the Lausanne Standards were developed and the role that research played.

GMI is honored to have conducted the first round of research (mentioned in the presentation) that supported the development of the Lausanne Standards.   Rob Martin, Lausanne Senior Associate for Global Philanthropy, whose voice (and likeness) feature prominently in the video, graciously gave us permission to discuss some of that research here on this blog.

A survey of 147 mission leaders – divided roughly 55/45 between ministry implementers and ministry donors – revealed that both groups agreed that positive funding partnerships are almost always an important issue.  However, the leaders were divided on whether partnerships were problematic, and what the nature of the problems (if any) and solutions were.

Cluster analysis led to the identification and description of four “attitude segments” among ministry donors and implementers.  This enabled the research sponsors to understand the likely objections to developing a set of guidelines for philanthropic partnerships.

 

Each of these groups believes that funders and implementers want to partner well with one another.  However, each could pose a significant objection to the process of developing standards for effective funding partnerships.  Proceeding clockwise around the grid, from top left:

  1. Standards aren’t enough to fix the problems of dependence and power in philanthropy!  We need to overhaul the system and create new structures for working together.
  2. There isn’t a problem to address – the perceived conflicts in philanthropic partnerships are exaggerated.  Just because the work is hard doesn’t mean the system is broken.
  3. You can’t engineer a policy-based solution to a spiritual problem.  Partnership issues will dissolve when people focus more on the Lord and recognize their common dependence on God.
  4. Codes and policies are no substitute for deeper relationships with one another.  Making a greater effort to understand our neighbor will lead to more effective partnership, with or without a set of standards.

The Lausanne working group’s responses to these objections are:

  1. Yes, we can benefit from creating new forms.  Finding points of affirmation is a perfect starting point.
  2. Yes, the work is challenging, and good communication will help us to address challenges more effectively.
  3. Yes, human-centered solutions are insufficient.  Agreements must be developed and implemented in reliance on the Spirit.
  4. Yes, we must grow in understanding – and agreed-upon standards reflect an increasing level of understanding.

Watch the video again to see how some of these messages are communicated clearly and effectively.  That’s research in action!  Here, segmentation is not a tool to create or emphasize division but a means of addressing concerns to develop consensus and discover unity among varied perspectives.

Research for the sake of knowledge puffs up, but research for the sake of love builds up (variation on 1 Corinthians 8:1).  How are you are seeing research applied in your area of ministry?